Document Type

Article

Publication Date

1-2015

Keywords

design, museum exhibitions, information

Abstract

Museum exhibitions are conventionally understood to be educational, meaning that they convey information to visitors. The content of this information is understood to include visual, auditory, and written media, as well as content from tactile, spatial, and social encounters. This article asserts that visitors also gain knowledge through bodily kinesthetic experiences while in the exhibition setting. Emerging research in other areas has revealed connections between physical posture and cognitive issues, such as emotion and attitude, but this has not yet been applied to museum practice. This article suggests that exhibition planning could exploit bodily experience more explicitly as a form of information; and that body-aware practices like sports, dance, and yoga offer intellectual content suitable for exploration in a museum setting.

Faculty

Faculty of Animation, Arts & Design

School

Department of Material Art and Design

Journal

Curator: The Museum Journal

Version

Pre-print

Peer Reviewed/Refereed Publication

no

Terms of Use

Terms of Use for Works posted in SOURCE.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Original Publication Citation

Overhill, H. (2015). Design as choreography: Information in action. Curator: The Museum Journal, 58(1), 5-15. doi:10.1111/cura.12094.

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