Document Type

Article

Publication Date

11-24-2014

Keywords

interpersonal violence, intergroup violence, sexual assault

Abstract

The social identity approach makes a distinction between behavior motivated by intergroup versus interpersonal identities, which may be relevant to victim blaming in the case of rape. Using a mock jury paradigm, we examined the impact of defining rape as an act of interpersonal violence (personal assault) versus intergroup violence (a ‘‘hate crime’’), crossed with a manipulation describing the attacker as either an acquaintance or stranger. Defining rape in intergroup terms led to less victim blame than when it was defined in interpersonal terms, and participants blamed the victim more when she was assaulted by an acquaintance than a stranger.

Comments

02 November 2016: At the time of publication, Sheridan College author Lisa Droogendyk was associated with Simon Fraser University.

Faculty

Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences

School

School of Social and Life Sciences

Journal

PLoS ONE

Version

Publisher's version

Peer Reviewed/Refereed Publication

yes

Terms of Use

Terms of Use for Works posted in SOURCE.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

Original Publication Citation

Droogendyk, L., & Wright, S.C. (2014). Perceptions of interpersonal versus intergroup aggression: The case of sexual assault. PLoS ONE, 9(11):e112365. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0112365

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