Document Type

Article

Publication Date

9-4-2012

Keywords

cooking, division of labour, domestic labour, foodwork, gender, leisure, men/masculinity, poststructuralism, work

Abstract

Market research documents a rising passion for cooking among men. Yet, some feminists argue that men see cooking as ‘leisure’ in part because they have distance from day-to-day care obligations. However, empirical research on men’s home cooking is still limited. This article investigates the relationship between cooking and leisure among 30 Canadian men with significant household cooking responsibilities. Drawing on interview, observational and diary data, and poststructural conceptualizations of leisure, I ask, to what extent do these men understand cooking as leisure and why? Opposing the notion that women’s cooking is ‘work’ and men’s, ‘leisure’, I find that these men experience cooking as ‘work-leisure’ complicated by worries about others’ preferences, health and approval. However, I also argue that participants create leisurely cooking by manipulating cooking spaces and time(s), and it is in the ease with which they do so that gender (as well as class and race) hierarchies become more visible.

Faculty

Faculty of Humanities & Social Sciences

Journal

Sociology

Volume

47

Issue

4

First Page

623

Last Page

638

Version

Publisher's version

Peer Reviewed/Refereed Publication

yes

Terms of Use

Terms of Use for Works posted in SOURCE.

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 4.0 License.

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